New This Week! Organic Peruvian Staples From Baby Brasa, and Manchi Serves Up Healthy Southern Indian Inspired Dishes!🍗

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Bienvenido, Baby Brasa!

Chef/Entrepreneur/Model/Singer/Actor Franco Noriega is more than just quintuple threat, he’s leading the charge on Peruvian Chicken in NYC with his lively West Village restaurant, Baby Brasa. Opened just a few years back, the former star-turned-restauranteur Franco has established himself as one of the elite Peruvian chefs in NYC. As seen on Ellen, ABC, and Live with Kelly and Ryan, Franco emphasizes the freshness of the ingredients, as well as the traditional Peruvian methods of cooking. This all organic Peruvian spot is typically a sit-down restaurant, however, we’re ditching the wait time and bringing this premier partner straight to you.

While the traditional Peruvian chicken is not to be missed, some of their other dishes are absolute standouts as well. The ceviche is an unforgettable mix of flounder, two types of corn, onions, sweet potatoes, and a refreshing mix of citrus juices.

The Lomo Saltado, one of the most popular Peruvian dishes, is a must-try as well. It is a stir-fry combining marinated strips of sirloin with onions, tomatoes, french fries, and other spices; Served with perfectly cooked Peruvian rice. Take your tastebuds for a dip and get the delicately cooked salmon with a passion fruit reduction sauce, served with white rice.

With so many great options, you’re sure to find the perfect dish for lunch. 

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Mangia Manchi!

Okay, this place is not Italian, but the food is great! From the tastebuds behind Bombay Sandwich Co. comes a new and exciting Indian restaurant, emphasizing the flavors of Southern India. The eatery, which means ‘good’ in Telugu, presents food from the Andhra region of Southern India in a fast-casual dining setting. Manchi’s vegetable-forward and gluten-free menu is composed of core dishes found in the region.

Enjoy fresh and delicious proteins like cracked chicken or cracked chickpea tofu, with a base of either quinoa, rice, or kale salad, and toppings like spiced veggies including eggplant, cauliflower, potato, and rainbow slaw.

The Classic Curried Chicken Bowl features curried cracked chicken with eggplant, string beans, rainbow slaw, and Indian yoghurt sauce, served over rice. Want something completely different? Try The Detox, a large bowl of kitchari, a savory Indian porridge made with lentils, rice, carrots, peas, and ghee (clarified butter).

Manchi Bojanam! (Enjoy your meal!)

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Also, be sure to try this week’s sponsored sample:

The Dabbawalas of Mumbai

Artists are inspired by the works of Rembrandt and Da Vinci, world leaders by Gandhi and MLK, and techies by Apple and Google. We wouldn’t be much of a food delivery service if we weren’t inspired by the precision and efficiency of the dabbawalas of Mumbai. If you’ve never heard of these folks, it’s time you did.

But let’s first start with a few statistics about Mumbai, India’s financial capital:

Population: 13 million (most populous city in India; sixth most populous in the world)

Population density: 55,794 people per square mile.

No. of people who use the services of the dabbawalas: 200,000

So who are the dabbawalas and why are they such an integral part of Mumbai’s working world?

The term “dabbawala” means “lunchbox man” or “tiffin man” (dabba= lunchbox or tiffin). The dabbawalas are a network of food delivery men who have been serving the city of Mumbai since 1880. They are not caterers. They pick up “dabbas” or prepared lunch boxes from various homes across the city and have it delivered to middle class office workers. Usually, the food is cooked and packed by the wives of the men working in these organizations. A dabbawala will pick up the lunch boxes, place them on a hand cart and use his bicycle to ride to the closest railway station. Here, he will pass on the lunch boxes to his colleagues who use the local trains to deliver the lunch boxes to the consumers. Before a lunch box reaches the consumer, it has changed hands at least 6 times. After lunch, the dabbawalas deliver the empty dabbas back to the respective houses.

Cost to customer for the service: Rs. 350 – Rs. 400 per month (approx $7)

No. of dabbawalas in Mumbai: Approximately 5000

Monthly salary of a dabbawala: Rs. 8000 (around $133.5), regardless of role and experience.

So why do these office-goers just not eat from the office canteen or pick up food from restaurants? Most cite health reasons, dietary preferences, hygiene reasons and the simple preference for a home-cooked meal.

And why don’t the office-goers take their lunch with them in the mornings instead of having it delivered? To understand that, you have to have experienced a commute on a Mumbai local train. Approximately 6.1 million people use Mumbai’s local trains every day. It takes considerable skill and perseverance to board these trains. Think the New York subway but with many more people, and with a good amount of pushing, shoving and yelling involved. Add to this mix a hot and humid climate, and you can imagine how uncomfortable the experience can get. You need both hands to board the crammed train, so carrying a lunch box is close to impossible. 

Additionally, the typical office worker leaves home before 7:00 am.  A dabbawala may come home to pick up the food an hour or two later, which gives the women of the house a bit of time to prepare the meal.

The delivery work requires great time management and precision. The only technology the dabbawalas use are the local trains. It is interesting to note that these men have little to no formal education. In fact, most of them can only identify alphabets. Yet they manage to deliver these 200,000 dabbas to 200,000 customers on time every day and bring the dabbas back to each home. According to former Forbes editor Subrata Chakravarty, the dabbawalas make only one mistake in 16 million deliveries.

Truly inspiring stuff for a food start-up! We at KS strive to achieve the same efficiency in our deliveries. May the dabbawala gods be with us!